Monday, October 26, 2015

Android 6.0 Marshmallow: Urging “Sweetware” Marchers Up

Since part one of this review didn’t cover everything we wanted to tell you about, let’s continue exploring the Marshmallow.

Fingerprinting Carries a Price
Fingerprints are going to open up a well of new opportunities for Android users. As promised, Google will "standardize support" for fingerprint scanners on devices running the Marshmallow enabling both real-life shopping and Play Store purchases, let alone the usual phone unlocking. The worst news is that those not having a hardware fingerprint scanner are left to kick themselves for the time.


A Nap to Rehab
To put in good order the information on the maximum and average RAM usage of apps, Google has implemented a new RAM manager providing phone owners with knowledge of an individual app's RAM consumption and its background functioning frequency, as well as suggestions on how to increase device performance and battery life.

Employing a new power management function named “Doze”, the Marshmallow adopters will improve their phones’ standby time up to twice longer than the devices running Lollipop. Equipped with motion detectors, the scheme puts a device into a low-power state if it has been idle for a while, thus blocking background processes and network connectivity and keeping only major notifications on. 

The new software supports USB Type-C speeding up charging process and enabling users to charge another device with theirs.

“Erase and Rewind”: Secure Data
Android Marshmallow is an amazingly prudent software featuring an automatized app backup that duplicates all the data required for the app reinstallation to Google Drive via Wi-Fi keeping all the passwords and settings on. Up to 25 MB of storage for each app is provided, let alone a user's default Google Drive storage.

A little bit longer it takes in the new Android software version to find network settings, as by now they are pushed away to the Backup and Reset options and tagged Network Settings Reset. The best news is that the feature helps quickly delete all the network settings, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connections, and cellular data included. 

Artistic Play of Android Pay
Debuting on Android Marshmallow, Google's new mobile payments system Android Pay is going to feature Android Lollipop and KitKat updates as well. Designed to simplify and speed up the checkout process, Android Pay serves as quite a credit card locker. As far as the system operates through NFC, one can carry out transaction simply putting his or her phone against any touch payment equipped terminal. No need to open any additional apps to put Android Pay into work — a single touch is enough for payment. For security matters, any transaction is provided with a virtual account number in order not to disclose personal data to merchants. The system functions with Visa, MasterСard, Verizon, Discovery, Amex, as well as T-Mobile and AT&T.


Seems like quite a handful of good news altogether, but some observers become anxious seeing the new Android version entering the game while the Lollipop one still remains quite a youngster in the market.   Have you already had a good time tasting Android Marshmallow and found any good fits or annoying bits? Considered the issue of Android fragmentation? Let’s discuss!